Family:
Sapindaceae
Scientific Name:
Acer negundo
Toxins:
hypoglycin A
Flower Color:
Found:
Moist woods, stream banks, floodplains

Geographical Distribution

Boxelder  distribution - United States

Boxelder

Acer negundo

Ash Leaf Maple, Three-Leaf Maple
10/ 10
Boxelder (Acer negundo) is a hardy and fast-growing, small to medium-sized tree which is often planted for shade. It is distinguishable by its reddish coloring. The red coloration is due to a pigment found in a fungus (Fusarium negundi) that commonly afflicts the tree. Boxelder has been called 'poison-ivy tree' because its 3-parted leaves resemble those of poison ivy.

Boxelder's leaves turn yellow before falling off in the fall. It produces brown fruits which matures in September or October and often remains hanging in clusters on the branches throughout the winter. Boxelder is the most widely distributed of all the North American maples, ranging from coast to coast and from Canada to Guatemala.

Toxic components
The seeds of the boxelder tree contain the toxin hypoglycin A.